Separation Agreement Sole Custody

If a relationship ends, your responsibilities to the children in the relationship are maintained after you separate from the other parent. The division of child-raising tasks after separation is set out in a custody and access agreement – an important element of a separation agreement. A court may also issue a custody and treatment order. Whether you have sole or joint custody, your separation agreement should include: if the parents are unable to reach an agreement, you can enter into a custody and access agreement through mediation, negotiation by lawyers or in court. Going to court gives you any control over the final custody and visitation agreement, but it`s the only option in situations where you can`t agree with the other parent. When you go to court, you should always have a lawyer to represent you. Under the sole care of the child, the child lives with a parent who makes decisions about his or her life. The other parent usually has access to the child. Interim custody orders often become permanent because it is less inconvenient for children to stay in one place with a parent. Sole custody includes both legal and physical custody. A parent may have one or the other.

Custody is complete when legal and physical custody is assigned to a parent. Creating and following an educational plan during separation helps your child adjust to your family`s new situation. Your educational calendar creates consistency and structure while ensuring that your child spends enough time with each parent. The more specific and organized your plan is, the better it will help you be a co-parent during your separation and beyond. An effective educational plan for separation implies that shared custody does not mean that children live in the same way with both parents. Joint childcare arrangements are very different from the specifics of the child`s stay. . . .